a market hall

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This is a collection of market types, with four ancient Greek stoae on the ground level, double stairs up to the second floor market halls, skylit, and further to the commodities trading levels within the tower.  An atrium spans between the four levels.  An enlarged plan of the entry lobby finishes the drawing set.

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aalto revisited

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I had wanted to draw this while we were on site, but the monk who was giving us a tour was moving at a brisk rate.  This is the entrance pavilion to Aalto’s Library at Mount Angel, as previously featured here, and is worth featuring because of the inherent classicism of it all – strictly modular, rigidly symmetrical (minus that one angled wall on the right), with a well-coordinated ceiling plan, brick floor patterning, column placement, and door/storefront alignment.  For the über-modernist Aalto, this is proof that his early education in Nordic Classicism never truly left.  Details below.

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elevations

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Three buildings I saw while driving cross town = three quick elevation studies: A symmetrical hip-roofed house with a long continuous masonry wall that continues to form a low wall on the rear yard; A series of openings on a flat stucco wall, centered on one large square picture window (the jack arches are my own); A square light well lined with industrial sash windows, and a clapboard volume beneath.

a pool house

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A square with brick exterior walls, with a square pool in the center.  One half of the enclosure is fleshed out on the interior with modern details, while the other has a classical impluvium roof, but with the same sliding glass doors as the modern half.  An unfolded wormseye (upview) axonometric is below.

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wall treatment

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Maybe not what most people consider ‘capital-A’ architecture, but interesting nonetheless – interior walls and their treatment.  These four options are studies for my own house, with coved ceilings, picture rail, wall base, chair rail, and wainscot sticking.  The two top options explore large-scale masonry patterns a la Michael Graves, while the two bottom options divide the wall into sections, from many stripes to more distinct panels.

a barn to live in

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Taking its form from some barn structures I passed on my trip to Oregon, this house has two opposing axes, one large gable, and a hip-ish roof.  A spiral stair gently curves out on the side opposite the main entry.  Classical details sit happily next to vernacular forms.  Further formal explorations below

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a dutch gable folly

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Part gable, part hip roof: the dutch gable.  This small pavilion is a simple post-and-beam structure, on a four-square plan, with shingled walls set in antis to the columns on two sides, all beneath a large square dutch gable roof.  The roof is inherently directional, always favoring one axis of the other, even though the eaves remain constant.  The bottom drawings attempt to subvert this, making the dutch gable diagonally symmetrical, similar to the roof of a small cabin I featured some weeks past.

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a tower

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Taking cues from a small apartment complex south of Wilshire Boulevard, this small tower features an upper story that steps out over the lower floor, with a large, oversized ogee profile between the two, cut through with arched windows.  The resulting effect is reminiscent of machicolation found on medieval embattlements.

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