ungers and lutyens do a kitchen

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I began by drawing cabinetry I found in a new volume on O. M. Ungers, then for whatever reason took a look through a book on Lutyens, where I found a small round wood kitchen island, detailed as four miniature Tuscan columns. I’m not one to shrink from putting two incongruous styles alongside one another, so why not? Lutyens’ kitchen at Castle Drogo, itself a riff on Soane, informed the ceiling.

two facade studies and a rotunda

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Facade as generator: that is, starting with a facade and working back to a floor plan instead of the opposite, more traditional, fashion.  Here, a scored plaster exterior references brick construction, with radiating joints at the circular window and jack arches over the rectangular side windows.  A tall pyramidal skylight centers the whole.

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Another facade, this time actual brick with rounded corners, simple square double-hung windows under jack arches with thin metal overhangs and stone shoulders at the inset front door.  The plan suggests a small linear courtyard at the center.

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This circular rotunda has a few things going on in plan that a section won’t illustrate.  But not to mind, for the section shows enough of its own intrigue.  The dome is cut, making it shallow at the center than the ends.  A large skylight sits above, illustrated here as a small tempietto, a room beyond a room, above which the skylight proper is positioned.

a rotunda

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This is a simple room, with a shallow dome set on squinches capping a square room.  The whole is topped with a small tempietto-cum-oculus.  A perpendicular section (top-left) is paired with a diagonal section (top-right), and a wormseye sectional axonometric on the bottom-right.

on projections

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I’m fascinated by drawing projections, that is the way that we draw or project the linework of a floor plan into elevations, sections, axonometrics, etc.  The drawings I feature here on frame clearly show that.  But I know that often the thing to be drawn is often obfuscated by the drawing itself, where the projection can overpower the building itself.  Today I present not a project per se, but a series of different projections of the same simple architectural form – a cube with a small dome and oculus.

The simple plan of the upper-left is revealed in simple section and elevation, and explored in two different axonometrics below – aerial and wormseye (upview).  Oblique axons, my special sectional wormseye oblique axon, and sectional axons flesh out the sheet.

three squares

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Three sketches, three squares, in anticipation for my 3X10 birthday tomorrow (the 3rd).

The first, an elevation, with an arcade atop two square windows in a wall – Traditional form with abstraction below.

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The second, a plan, square in form, but diagonal in organization, with a nice entry rotunda on the corner.  This is an homage to Schindler’s diagonal square plans (the How House and Bethlehem Baptist Church, plan), and his mentor’s detailing at the Ennis Brown House.

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The third, in a three-dimensional axonometric, a modernist cube.

a pavilion

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To celebrate one year of frame, I have something special for you all.  That’s right, a small, un-programmable garden pavilion.  A four-square frame of 4X4’s set on the diagonal, with a copper standing seam roof atop and a brick base below.  There’s no way in, just a beautiful form without.  Better than cake, right?

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the courtyard variations

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More than just a Bach reference, that title could really be the title of this entire blog, since the vast majority of what I post here are really just different takes on courtyards.  Blame it on my being a SoCal native, blame it on my love of squares, palazzi, and any other architectural trope you can.  I love me some courtyards.  So here we go again.  At the top, a more detailed elevation of a previous project, and below, a different take on that same floor plan, this time more loudly echoing Giorgio Grassi and Louis Kahn.

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two stair towers

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One square, one circular.  The square has a radial winder stair inside (but cut as a square), while the circle has a square stair inside, with habitable spaces inside of that inner square.  This particular example is a rift on a project by Oswald Mathias Ungers, where circular and square towers are set alongside one another (and of course, I can’t track it down, though I know it’s in the Electa monograph. . .).

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a gate

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A friend and I were out exploring the local architectural haunts here in the Los Angeles area, which in this case included Pasadena’s Gamble House of 1908 as well as the other Greene & Greene homes studding the neighborhood.  One of these sits kitty-corner to Frank Lloyd Wright’s La Miniatura (or Millard House) of 1923, and I noticed a lovely wrought iron gate at the rear of the property, almost coyly unimpressive against dynamic klinker brick wall.  I began to think of my own home, and if a similar wrought iron gate would work against its Spanish revival aesthetic, with some details massaged here and there.  Not a building per se, but a linguistic study nonetheless.  Now if I can just find a blacksmith and a few dollars. . .

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nine-square staircase

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This is a piece of a larger puzzle, the basic parti of which is sketched above.  The stair is located centrally in the square plan, and is itself a nine-square plan.  Tectonically, the stair is supported on a peristyle of Tuscan pilasters, while the stair proper is takes its details from Mies’ Crown Hall at IIT, and tall fireplaces occupy three sides (their form, a take on Schindler’s Kings Road House.

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